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I remember some movie, I think it was from the 50s or 60s (maybe the 40s).

The main character had found a lot of money or something, but not that much. So he goes and runs into a casino with a girl and places a large bet on a roulette wheel. He thinks it's his lucky day, but the roulette guy knows him and says he won't let him make the bet. The casino owner tells the guy to let him make it, and then the main character loses.

I remember that it wasn't Rain Man, but that's all I remember.

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2 Answers 2

I think you may be describing Dark Hazard with Edward G Robinson. Here's a description copied from a review.

Dark Hazard (1934) is a tale of a degenerate gambler named Jim “Buck” Turner, played by Edward G. Robinson. The film opens with Turner celebrating a $20,000 score when a long shot horse comes in for him, but the scene ends with him broke at the roulette wheel, borrowing cab fare to get home. Dark Hazard is primarily about his struggle with this vicious cycle of highs and lows that faces all gamblers. Fans of Robinson will enjoy the typical pugnacious and pugilistic style that he brings to the role.

Here's a picture.

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I don't think this is it. –  Andrew Latham Feb 24 '12 at 19:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's The Sting

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which is from 73. Btw you can accept your own answer so that others won't search anymore –  Theta33 Feb 25 '12 at 4:16
3  
Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. –  TylerShads Feb 25 '12 at 5:55
    
The script for The Sting is online at awesomefilm.com/script/thesting.html. The scene that Andrew is looking for can be found by scrolling to the section "COMING INTO A POOR MAN'S GAMBLING JOINT". Hooker (Robert Redford) loses his ill-gotten bankroll on a crooked roulette wheel. –  Wilf Rosenbaum Feb 26 '12 at 9:39

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