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In The World's End, Nick Frost's character Andy notices this wristband that Gary King was wearing.

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I suppose that it's connected to the Alcoholics Anonymous-like support group meeting towards the beginning of the movie. But what does it mean exactly? What is he suffering from? Are we given any clues during the support group scene?

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Looks like an ID band that a hospital might put on an in-patient. –  iandotkelly Sep 23 '13 at 19:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The answer is hidden below, because it is spoiler-ish. These are things that were inferred.

Simon Pegg's characters has a wristband because he was in a hospital because he tried to kill himself, the group that he was in was a support group to help him deal with things. This all comes out when Nick Frost see's the bandages on the wrist and asks what happened and Pegg replies that everything was supposed to be awesome after they graduated and it never got any better.

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Thanks. That makes sense in terms of the plot. I would still appreciate a little more concrete evidence. Won't patients who accidentally OD'd also get such a band? Is there any reason why he couldn't have simply removed it? Why would he keep it on? –  coleopterist Sep 24 '13 at 5:01
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It could be an OD, but that wouldn't explain the bandages on the wrists. He could have removed it, but then you take away the 10 minute scene where he and Nick Frost are fighting and you have no explanation about what the beginning of the movie was about. Albeit far from official, wikipedia supports my answer: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World's_End_(film) - I did not edit it :) –  drneel Sep 24 '13 at 11:21

Watch the movie with the commentary on, Simon specifically says that his character, Gary, was committed to treatment after trying to commit suicide. Also, Gary's journey through the Golden Mile was also a suicide mission, he didn't care if he lived at that point as he had nothing to live for.

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