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The show Fairly Legal employs some references to The Wizard of Oz (also note the usage of "The Yellow Brick Road Song" as theme song), in particular Kate using different roles as knicknames on her cell phone for the people in her life:

  • The Wicked Witch - for her boss and stepmother Lauren, whom she doesn't like for probably both those aspects, but who isn't as evil as Kate thinks her to be.

  • The Lion - for her assistant Leonardo ("Leo"), who is kind of "nerdy" and sometimes helps Kate steer clear of her chaos.

  • The Tin-Man - for her husband Justin, which she is separated from yet seems to have an on-and-off relationship with.

  • The Wizard - for her late father, with whom she has somehow different views of the law in practice.

  • And I'd just infer Kate, who indeed seems a bit lost at times, to be Dorothy then.

(Did I maybe forget anyone here? Strangely enough her brother doesn't seem to have knickname.)

But having only superficial knowledge about The Wizard of Oz, I'm not sure if to make anything more out of those references than a mere side joke. Do these references have any deeper meaning? Do those Wizard of Oz characters and their roles in the story maybe provide a description of the corresponding Fairly Legal characters or at least how Kate sees them?

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1 Answer 1

The references are not "side jokes" but metaphors on Kate's view of them.

The Wicked Witch opposes. The Lion helps without confronting. The Tin-Man wants to understand but confuses his options. The Wizard sees all and knows all from his perspective which is different than the perspective of Kate.

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"The Tin-Man wants to understand but confuses his options." - I guess I need some help with this one. –  Napoleon Wilson Feb 7 at 10:15
    
In the Wizard of Oz, the Tin-Man wants a heart but already has one. I interpreted that as questioning his decisions/motives and thus insecure in choices. –  Jeff Mahaney Feb 25 at 18:03

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