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In the beginning of A Separation, Nader didn't really want to get divorced and was only trying to oppose his wife's decision seemingly wanting to convince her his own way. But, at the middle of the film, he started to change his mind and he got really serious about going through with this decision. What made him, a character who doesn't seem to make any decisions without enough reasons, change his mind?

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2 Answers 2

It doesnt not depend on Nader's nationality, it's about Nader's personality. During the film we understand Nader was a bullheaded man, and his recalcitrance was a reason to divorce.

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but the film is totally based on reasoning. i don't think being bullheaded can be a real reason that his decision about his marriage and divorce altered completely during the events that happened through the movie –  arianoo Sep 13 '13 at 16:43

You know that's what love is. Well first of all you need to understand how life and relationships work around in Iran. Its not America! So here's the thing:

Usually once you're married for a long time (for more than 5-10 years) and then want a divorce, you probably start to think about the future of your kids. Not only this but in well-cultured families the people fear how society will react to their decision.Also if your financially struggling, it definitely adds to the pressure.The movie starts off in that fashion where Nader has not yet given a thought to the future, hence he tries to review the decision made which will affect him, his wife and his children.

Men do care you know ;-)

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but he seems a reasonable person all along and it doesn't make sense that he hadn't given a thought about his life before his wife asked him for a divorce. –  arianoo Sep 13 '13 at 16:59

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