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I understand the Adamantium is hard to break. I get the idea of normal metal not able to break it since they are not as hard as Adamantium, I also understand that perhaps when Adamantium hit Adamantium, it can possibly break since they are the same hardness.

In The Wolverine, the sword used to cut the claws was heated. When metal is heated, it becomes liquid if heated long enough, or at least the metal will become softer (molecules moving faster, in other words metal can be bend easier when heated). So my question is, if this is true and the heated metal is softer, why would it cut the claw which is harder since it is not heated?

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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adamantium , depending on what types of answers you are looking for, you might consider browsing scifi.stackexchange. IIRC, wolverines claws have been come up over there plenty of times. –  Colin D Jul 30 '13 at 15:29

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From the Wikipedia article for adamantium: Adamantium's extremely stable molecular structure prevents it from being further molded even if the temperature is high enough to keep it in its liquified form.

Since this is a fictitious material, you are excused from unsuccessfully applying real world insight. If there is an answer, it is because the overall strength and force of the sword overcomes the lesser strength of the claws, perhaps based on material thickness, or maybe its shape. (Or it could be just because the script writer says so.)

Anyway, if adamantium is going to be cut, what else would be able to do it?

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I will mark this right as I believe the movie scriptwriters screwed up –  Huangism Jul 30 '13 at 17:44
    
I think the answer, "Because it's in the script" could be used quite often and be correct in most of those instances. Speculation and interpretation are sometimes our only tools. –  Paulster2 Aug 1 '13 at 22:56
    
I initially thought it's like the expression "hot knife through butter"-Something hot is supposed to cut something better than the same thing but not heated. Sure, its only an expression and it's highly implausible movie-makers would base a crucial scene on an expression... –  Fikko3107 Nov 13 '13 at 16:47

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