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I realise I'm teetering on the edge of duplication here but I'll try and phrase as accurately as I can (a lot of the previous questions have been based around the drilling).

Does Wolverine still have his healing ability at the end of the film?

  • Although he has been "declawed" his bone claws have regrown, implying that he has
  • The silver samurai attempted to steal his ability. It's my understanding that he did this by triggering it (via cutting off his claws) then extracted it, the fact that Logan survived and the samurai didn't implies to me that he failed.
  • He almost certainly has his full skeleton (missing claws) because magneto could control him

However I found the entire ending of the film very confusing... my question - does Wolverine still have his healing ability at the end of the film or has it been taken from him?

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Adamantium is indestructible and CAN't be 'reconstituted' once it has turned to solid form... –  user5912 Aug 25 '13 at 23:57
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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Yes, he has his healing ability and the adamantium skeleton minus the claws which were original bone anyway and due to his healing ability he can regrow the bone.

The silver samurai was taking his bone marrow which is believed to be the source of his healing factor...numerous discussion as to if this is the case or not.

The script implies that the "Viper" mutant knew how to weaken his immune system (healing ability) in order to prepare him for a marrow transplant.

Sequel Script Spoiler Alert (Factual):

In the end when he is talking with Mariko you can see Yuriko (his "bodyguard") next to the steps of the airplane in the background being given a green rectangular box with a yellow ribbon securing it. This box contains his claws that were cut for the next movie where he "may" have them reconstituted and grafted to his skeletal structure.

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Good anwer - what confuses me is that they were talking all the way through about "transfer" not copy. Which implies that that when the SS became young it had been transferred? Can you explain? –  Liath Jul 29 '13 at 7:57
    
It would appear that he needed the blood in his bone marrow which is apparently "richer" for transfusions. The villainess "Viper" was a specialist in metagenes so one could guess that she knew Logan's bloodtype and compatibility for the SS. I think a raw marrow transplant like that would be extremely painful and while it was occurring you could see Logan's appearance diminishing...this could be from the healing/"immortality" factor being drained from his body. Just like with any marrow transplant the bone marrow often grows back and with Logan it looked to be quick. –  BurbankStudios Jul 30 '13 at 2:22
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After Wolverine was exposed to Adamantium during the bonding process, his regenerative powers altered the nature of of the Adamantium allowing it to be regenerated like his normal skeleton. (Don't ask because this makes no sense to me either.) This beta adamantium is supposedly as strong as true adamantium but that is unlikely since his bone structure would be as porous as his bones were originally. Source

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Yes but this does not apply to the film universe , as you see his claws grow back at the end , and they are bone not adamantium –  howler Dec 17 '13 at 13:10
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Yes he does, he heals the original claws back, and you see the silver samurai weeken and turned old again, implying that logan has his powers of regeneration back In the new movie, he's a boss.

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-1: Hello and Welcome to the Movies and TV Stack Exchange. Your answer is fairly disjointed, doesn't go into much detail and gets both opinionated and offensive towards the end. To understand how to both ask and answer questions on the site, please take the "Tour" under the "Help" menu at the top of the page. –  Andrew Martin Mar 15 at 19:38
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