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In the movie 12 Monkeys, when James Cole was sent back in time for the second time, they sent him by mistake to the WW1 era. But I think the place where they sent him was not in USA, but in Europe and people spoke on some other language, like German. Does it mean that time travel includes space travel too?

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It would seem logical to me that any form of time travel would imply spacial travel as well. The earth is constantly rotating on its axis and orbiting the sun. If you traveled through time but not space (i.e. ended up in the same exact point in space) then you might end up in the vacuum of space, or even the interior of the earth.

That being said, if the scientists in the future sent him back to the wrong time, it's logical to say that their miscalculation would have landed him in the wrong position in space as well.

See the section titled Time Travel or Spacetime Travel on the Wikipedia article Time travel for more information.

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There is no absolute space coordinates. If they used coordinates regarding Sun, and send him to wrong time by mistake, most probably he should be out of Earth, in free space. Most probably they should use Earth coordinates, in this case he should be in the same place on the Earth. –  Alex Jul 27 '13 at 17:16
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"Most probably they should use Earth coordinates" - This implies that they can choose the coordinates and this in turn would mean they could very well make a mistake in choosing those (which could send him to Europe). If they couldn't change his position at all, then they couldn't use Earth coordinates either and the only position Cole could land at was either random (which wouldn't be that good an idea at all) or the exact same absolute space position. –  Napoleon Wilson Jul 27 '13 at 17:28
    
What is exact same absolute space position? It doesn't exist according to Theory of relativity. –  Alex Jul 27 '13 at 17:41
    
@Alex Meh, be it so. –  Napoleon Wilson Jul 27 '13 at 18:03

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