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It was observed again and again in the movie Avatar that humans could not breathe the air present in Pandora. So it can be assumed Oxygen was not present in Pandora. But again the human fires which erupted in the Hometree bombing, wouldn't be sustained if there was no Oxygen at all. So what were the components present in the air of Pandora? On the other hand if there was Oxygen, why could not the humans breathe there? So was the atmosphere in Pandora Oxygen filled or Oxygen free?

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Why did you assume there was no oxygen? Why not assume the simplest: that there is noxious components to the air? –  wallyk Jul 23 '13 at 18:19
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up vote 21 down vote accepted

Quoting from Pandora wiki:

Pandora's Atmosphere components:

Pandora's atmosphere is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide (>18%), xenon (>5.5%), methane, and hydrogen sulfide (>1%) and is about 20% denser than the atmosphere on Earth primarily due to the high percentage of Xenon; a heavy, colorless, odorless, and generally unreactive noble gas.

Why can't human breathe in Pandora:

The high concentration of carbon dioxide in the Pandoran atmosphere makes it extremely poisonous to humans, rendering them unconscious in about 20 seconds and causing death in about 4 minutes. The hydrogen sulfide present is also quite poisonous; concentrations over 1000 ppm (0.1 %) can cause immediate collapse with subsequent loss of breathing, even after inhalation of a single breath.

So Oxygen is present there and that's why combustion is possible.

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I don't really think you can get much more of a textbook answer than that! –  Liath Jul 23 '13 at 15:40
    
@Liath, Absolutely.. As it is an imaginary planet, every detail fact is derived from the works related to it. –  Mistu4u Jul 27 '13 at 6:24
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