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Django Unchained and Inglorius Basterds are both set in the same alternative history universe according to Tarantino. How many of the films made by Tarantino are set in the same universe? Are any of the films he's wrote or starred in but not directed set in the same universe?

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At first the question itself didn't make much sense to me but, reading TylerShads answer I realise this is a crafty, intelligent question! Made my day! –  KeyBrd Basher Feb 15 '13 at 5:15

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up vote 15 down vote accepted

Tarantino is an odd figure, creating actual Universes for each of his characters that all tie into one another somehow.

They are broken up in a few categories including the Realer than Real Universe which include his history-altering pieces like Basterds where these people are supposed to be living in a real world, as in the way Hitler was offed in this Universe, as far as the people in Pulp Fiction are concerned, actually happened.

The first evidence of this was brought on with a connection between Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs where we have the Vega brothers, Vic and Vincent. Also, as a subtle hint, this image shows the connection between Pulp Fiction and Django Unchained with Captain Koons.

Then, we have what he refers to as the Movie Movie Universe where these movies are movies that the characters in his Realer than Real Universe can go see at their local theatre.

An interesting theory that has come of this is that Mia Wallace from Pulp Fiction could actually be playing The Bride - Beatrix Kiddo in Kill Bill, as she did attempt an acting career before and the Fox Force Five failed pilot has a lot of similarities to Kill Bill

In a matter to complicate things, it has been stated that he has characters than can crossover these borders to be in both universes; supposedly Winston Wolf as well as a lowly guard Earl McGraw meet this criteria.

Finally, we have Jackie Brown which apparently doesn't meet any of these criteria and is in it's own universe called the Elmore Leonard Universe. It seems this is set in its own universe because it was an adaptation of someone else's work, therefore it is set in its own universe entirely for this reason.

Explained rather briefly but still effectively in this little wiki page it states simply that

  • Reservoir Dogs
  • True Romance
  • Pulp Fiction
  • Death Proof
  • Inglorious Basterds
  • Django Unchained

    Are all a part of the Realer than Real Universe

While

  • Natural Born Killers
  • From Dusk 'Till Dawn
  • Kill Bill 1&2

Are all a part of the Movie Movie Universe

This image, shows a great visual connection of all these movies...though it is a bit outdated.

enter image description here

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+1, you beat me. –  Ankit Sharma Feb 14 '13 at 18:32
    
So, nested universes. Cool. –  DForck42 Feb 14 '13 at 19:21
    
Wow apparently there is more to it than I thought. This is a great break down but I'm still curious about a few shorts and tv shows that he's directed as well as anything that he's acted in as to whether or not they are then connected to his Universes. Also do you know if these are his terms for them? It sounds like him. Also this really helps to explain why Jackie Brown is so different than his other films. –  Kevin Howell Feb 14 '13 at 19:48
    
The terms are his, and as far as I'm aware this has only to do with his major films, mostly pictures above in the end graphic. I can do a bit of digging for his smaller stuff but I doubt it. –  TylerShads Feb 14 '13 at 20:21
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+1 Wow, what the? Never had expected Tarantino to put that much thought in it and it sounded like mere "fan fiction" at first. But then again, it's Tarantino. –  Napoleon Wilson Feb 14 '13 at 20:31

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